Showing 1 - 6 of 12 blog posts

Foxford Station April Update


Tuesday, 07 Apr 2020 at 04:13 pm

 


How Many Showings Should You Have Before You Receive A Purchase Offer?


Saturday, 29 Feb 2020 at 11:24 am

The graph above shows the average number of showings which houses in Hinsdale have had during the month of January (over the past three years) before they receive a purchase offer. If you have your Hinsdale house on market and have had 12 or more showings, it may be time to ask your broker 'What's wrong?'

 

 


Foxford Station Condos In Downtown Western Springs


Monday, 20 Jan 2020 at 04:39 pm

Foxford Station Condos

 

My team and I are pleased to announce our exclusive marketing brokerage partnership with Foxford Station Condos in downtown Western Springs.  This new construction development is ideally located in the vibrant center of town.  These well-appointed luxury condominiums exude a sense of style while providing functional layouts and amenities.  The 4 story brick and stone building includes 28 residences to provide an intimate ambience. 

The 2 and 3 bedroom residences range in size from 1,770-3,060 square feet and include terraces or balconies. The highly desirable and open floor plans include generously sized closets and neutral color palettes. Kitchens are equipped with high end Bosch appliance packages and high end cabinets.  Bathrooms are designed with Grohe and Kohler fixtures and porcelain tile flooring. Additional storage units are located on each floor for convenience.

Once you step outside,  you can choose from a wide range of shops and restaurants including Vie, Davanti and Hillgrove Tap.  Looking to venture into the city? The Metra train is just across the street.

If you're ready for a maintenance free lifestyle with luxury amenities and an enviable location,  contact us for a showing appointment today.

 


Appealing Your Real Estate Taxes In DuPage County


Tuesday, 19 Nov 2019 at 04:23 pm

Categories: realestatetaxappeal

Why Overpricing Your House Is a Worse Idea Than You Think


Wednesday, 13 Nov 2019 at 04:09 pm

When selling your house, one of the most important considerations is the asking price. How much will you ask for your house?

The asking price, or list price, directly impacts:

  1. If the real estate community will show your residence to prospective buyers;
  2. How aggressively the realtors will market your property;
  3. Which class of buyer will be drawn to your residence;
  4. How long your home will be exposed to the open market; and
  5. How much you will get for your house.

To best illustrate the impact of pricing, both proper and improper, I will outline typical scenarios of each.


IMPROPER PRICING:

When a property is priced too high, or over-listed, the real estate agents are the first to know. 
Potential buyers are second in line in this information chain. Neither group will become excited
about this overpriced listing, as it is reflective of a less than motivated seller. It is likely that the
property will still receive showings, but these showings will be fewer in number. The number of
showings will certainly decline as the term of the listing ages, as well. Moreover, it is likely that
the overpriced listing will be used by the agents and buyers as a benchmark for value; thus,
assisting in the more expedient marketing of more competitively priced properties. In other
words, your house will be used as a tool to sell other competing houses.


In the case where a buyer is genuinely interested in the overpriced listing, it is common for this
buyer to be reluctant to generate a purchase offer, as he or she may not want to generate an
offer that would be perceived as "low-ball" in the eyes of the seller. Second, if the buyer does
generate a purchase offer, he or she may increase this amount over what he or she would
actually like to offer initially. By increasing this amount, this buyer, in effect, is actually
communicating his second offer as, in his mind, this is the amount he would have countered if
the property were competitively priced.

In turn, the seller counters this initial offer with a "reasonable" counter offer, compared to his
inflated list price. Since the buyer has already increased his original offer price once,
psychologically he is less inclined to engage in more aggressive negotiations.
The seller of the over-listed property perceives this behavior as "low-balling". Furthermore, the
seller cannot comprehend why buyers are not partaking in the normal give and take of real
estate negotiations.

After a short period, the frequency of showings declines dramatically. The few remaining
showings are for those ultimately interested in other properties, but who are using the subject
property as an example of the upper limit of this specific property type. After a series of price
reductions and more desperate marketing measures, the property may actually sell. However, it
is likely that a higher sales price could have been achieved with proper list pricing, as outlined in
the next example.


PROPER LIST PRICING:

In any specific market niche, properties in a specific price range and specific property type have
an average sales price-to-list ratio. This ratio represents the sales price expressed as a
percentage of the final list price. Example would be a property that sold for $97,000 against a $100,000
list price has a sales-to-list ratio is 97%. This means that, on the average, after a property is
properly priced, it usually sells for 97% of the asking price within a reasonable marketing time.
As a motivated and informed seller, it is your goal to list your property within this parameter.
Using this example, if you list your residence within 3% of its market value (most probable
selling price), the market will respond in profound and dynamic ways.